Story image

Study says unknown malware is the biggest threat to security professionals

26 Oct 2017

What you know may hurt you, but it turns out what you don’t know is a bigger threat than ever before - at least when it comes to malware.

AI security firm Cylance commissioned a report by ESG which looks at the top threats IT and InfoSec professionals are concerned about, and how they will affect endpoint security decisions.

Out of 300 professionals across Japan, the US, UK, France and Germany, 35% noted that unknown malware was the most common threat in the last two years, but only 29% believe it is the top attack form. Almost half (49%) believe it is the greatest risk to their organisation.

“The threat landscape is constantly changing, but this research shows that just because an attack form is old, doesn’t mean it won’t remain effective,” said Doug Cahill, Senior Analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group.

Respondents also wised up in the ransomware stakes: Out of the 46% of respondents who experienced a ransomware attack in the last 12 months, 60% experienced a recurrence of the same ransomware. Fortunately, only 12% paid the ransom demands.

Attacks on endpoints affected respondents’ standard business operations (32%) and the impact on knowledge workers’ productivity (31%). 28% also cited delays to other IT projects as a factor.

However, they see machine learning as one strategy for managing endpoint security. 47% have deployed machine learning; and 23% are currently testing the technology. 25% are deploying it to increase productivity.

32% say that machine learning is able to detect unknown malware that traditionally evades other endpoint solutions.

“There is one reason phishing attacks are of extreme concern to 47 percent of businesses: they work. While new threats and zero-days will continue to keep security teams up at night, it will be a mixture of the old and new attack forms that keep them busy.”

Amongst the biggest bad actors, cybercriminals rank as concerning or extremely concerning by 90% of all respondents. Nation states, hacktivists were also worries. 78% are concerned about insiders; or those inside a company that could put security at risk.

ZombieLoad: Another batch of flaws affect Intel chips
“This flaw can be weaponised in highly targeted attacks that would normally require system-wide privileges or a complete subversion of the operating system."
Forget endpoints—it’s time to secure people instead
Security used to be much simpler: employees would log in to their PC at the beginning of the working day and log off at the end. That PC wasn’t going anywhere, as it was way too heavy to lug around.
DimData: Fear finally setting in amongst vulnerable orgs
New data ranking the ‘cybermaturity’ of organisations reveals the most commonly targeted sectors are also the most prepared to deal with the ever-evolving threat landscape.
IXUP goes "post-quantum" with security tech upgrade
The secure analytics company has also partnered with Deloitte as a reseller, and launched a SaaS offering on Microsoft Azure.
Infoblox appoints channels head for A/NZ
Kenneth Cartwright’s appointment extends Infoblox’s position in secure cloud-managed network services throughout the region.
ExtraHop’s new partner program for enterprise security
New accreditations and partner portal enable channel partners to fast-track their expertise and build their security businesses.
Hackers increasingly ‘island hopping’ – so what does it mean?
Carbon Black's Rick McElroy discusses this new trend and what it means for the new age of cybercrime.
Trust without visibility is blind – Avi Networks
Enterprises are wanting to gain the trust of their customers, but are often found blindly defending themselves.