Story image

Experts comment: Behind the Bluetooth 'BlueBorne' zero-days

14 Sep 2017

As news spreads of the Bluetooth zero-day that affects more than 5 billion devices, security experts are warning users to use Bluetooth with caution.

Originally discovered by security firm Armis, the BlueBorne vulnerabilities spread via over-the-air (OTA) attacks via Bluetooth. Attackers can penetrate all Bluetooth-enabled devices, corporate data, airgapped networks and spread malware laterally. They can also conduct man-in-the-middle attacks.

The firm has discovered eight zero-day vulnerabilities, of which four are listed as critical. While there is no mention if they have been used in the wild, the vulnerabilities are fully operational. They affect Android, iOS, Windows and Linux devices.

According to Trend Micro, the vulnerabilities are:

  • CVE-2017-1000251: a remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability in Linux kernel
  • CVE-2017-1000250: an information leak flaw in Linux’s Bluetooth stack (BlueZ)
  • CVE-2017-0785: an information disclosure flaw in Android
  • CVE-2017-0781: an RCE vulnerability in Android
  • CVE-2017-0782: an RCE flaw in Android
  • CVE-2017-0783: an MitM attack vulnerability in Android’s Bluetooth Pineapple
  • CVE-2017-8628: a similar MitM flaw in Windows’ Bluetooth implementation
  • CVE-2017-14315: an RCE vulnerability via Apple’s Low Energy Audio Protocol

According to Armis’ blog, attackers using the BlueBorne vulnerability can strike without any user interaction. The vulnerabilities work with all versions and only needs Bluetooth to be active.

“Unlike the common misconception, Bluetooth enabled devices are constantly searching for incoming connections from any devices, and not only those they have been paired with. This means a Bluetooth connection can be established without pairing the devices at all. This makes BlueBorne one of the most broad potential attacks found in recent years, and allows an attacker to strike completely undetected,” the blog says.

The company has reached out to Google, Microsoft, Apple, Samsung and Linux about the vulnerabilities. Armis says new solutions are needed to address the new airborne attack vector.

We’ve received comments from Venafi and Webroot about the BlueBorne vulnerabilities:

Venafi’s chief security strategist Kevin Bocek

“BlueBourne is a disturbing new attack on almost every computer, smartphone, and tablet. While the vulnerability itself is concerning, the real threat is most alarming: running applications and connecting to websites to execute more attacks, an issue that can only be addressed if every application, every website has a unique machine identity.”

“Without this – the attacks as demonstrated with BlueBourne – it’s all too easy for hackers to run malicious applications or redirect people to a fake website. BlueBourne shows why it’s so urgent for businesses to ensure that every web, desktop and mobile application has a unique machine identity so that they can maintain constant visibility and control.”

Webroot’s senior director of security architecture David Dufour

“BlueBorne is another example of how simple it is for hackers to quickly scan for, and then exploit, open Bluetooth devices. The learning curve to scan for Bluetooth devices isn’t that much greater than scanning for WIFI access points. To protect devices, users should turn off Bluetooth immediately after they are finished using it. Additionally, users should never connect to Bluetooth with a device that is running an old version of the software.

“For a while, Bluetooth vulnerabilities had died down as the industry responded and fixed known exploits, but this incident may be the tip of the iceberg once again. Just as we’ve seen a resurgence in worms, hackers often come back to repurpose the same exploits. Unfortunately in these cases, many connected devices don’t allow for patch management and become easy targets.”

CERT NZ:

  • In order to protect yourself from this vulnerability, these are the steps that CERT NZ recommends you take immediately to protect your devices.
  • Ensure you've patched all devices. CERT NZ recommends that you apply all security updates to all systems and software.
  • Disable Bluetooth on the device if it isn’t required.
  • If it isn’t possible to disable Bluetooth, check with the vendor or product manufacturer if an update is required and when it will be implemented.
  • Be careful when enabling Bluetooth in public as it has a range of around 10 metres, which could put the device at risk as Bluetooth attacks can be implemented remotely.
Industrial control component vulnerabilities up 30%
Positive Technologies says exploitation of these vulnerabilities could disturb operations by disrupting command transfer between components.
McAfee announces Google Cloud Platform support
McAfee MVISION Cloud now integrates with GCP Cloud SCC to help security professionals gain visibility and control over their cloud resources.
WatchGuard announces A/NZ partners awards
Four Australian companies were named partner award winners at the WatchGuard conference in Vietnam.
Telstra’s 2019 cybersecurity report
Cybersecurity remains a top business priority as the estimated number of undetected security breaches grows.
Why AI and behaviour analytics should be essential to enterprises
Cyber threats continue to increase in number and severity, prompting cybersecurity experts to seek new ways to stop malicious actors.
Scammers targeting more countries in sextortion scam - ESET
The attacker in the email claims they have hacked the intended victim's device, and have recorded the person while watching pornographic content.
Cryptojacking and failure to patch still major threats - Ixia
Compromised enterprise networks from unpatched vulnerabilities and bad security hygiene continued to be fertile ground for hackers in 2018.
Why cybersecurity remains a top business priority
One in two Australian businesses estimated that they will receive fines for being in breach of new legislation.