Story image

Attackers will get in: Three frameworks that help you through ransomware

22 Nov 2017

Did you know the first ransomware hit computers in 1989? The PC Cyborg Trojan demanded a $189 ransom. The Trojan hid all folders and encrypted files on a PC’s C: Drive. If victims didn’t pay the ransom, the ransomware’s actions would not be reversed.

Fast-forward to 2017 and WannaCry and NotPetya were easily the most prevalent ransomware strains. NotPetya was probably the most notorious.  

All it needed to do was use all saved SMB credentials on a Windows system and use these to log on to other machines. This means it could spread – fast. It also offered no way to contact the attacker in the event that victims paid the ransom.

These attacks are reminders that the cyber threat landscape is sophisticated to the point in which we have to accept that attackers will get into our networks.

But are we prepared? To successfully defend our organisations, we need to prepare and understand the indicators of compromise.

LogRhythm’s free guide takes an in-depth look at the typical phases of a ransomware attack, including:

  • How ransomware attacks begin – it can take as few as 15 minutes
  • How ransomware attacks progress through endpoints and networks
  • NIST, SANS and Navy incident frameworks that help organisations handle ransomware attacks
  • What you can do to prevent or limit an infection, including a five-step guide from preparation to recovery

With good planning and a definitive course of action, an attack can have a minimal impact to our organisations.

SecOps: Clear opportunities for powerful collaboration
If there’s one thing security and IT ops professionals should do this year, the words ‘team up’ should be top priority.
Interview: Culture and cloud - the battle for cybersecurity
ESET CTO Juraj Malcho talks about the importance of culture in a cybersecurity strategy and the challenges and benefits of a world in the cloud.
Enterprise cloud deployments being exploited by cybercriminals
A new report has revealed a concerning number of enterprises still believe security is the responsibility of the cloud service provider.
Ping Identity Platform updated with new CX and IT automation
The new versions improve the user and administrative experience, while also aiming to meet enterprise needs to operate quickly and purposefully.
Venafi and nCipher Security partner on machine identity protection
Cryptographic keys serve as machine identities and are the foundation of enterprise information technology systems.
Machine learning is a tool and the bad guys are using it
KPMG NZ’s CIO and ESET’s CTO spoke at a recent cybersecurity conference about how machine learning and data analytics are not to be feared, but used.
Seagate: Data trends, opportunities, and challenges at the edge
The development of edge technology and the rise of big data have brought many opportunities for data infrastructure companies to the fore.
Popular Android apps track users and violate Google's policies
Google has reportedly taken action against some of the violators.