Story image

ManageEngine survey hints that IT is more involved in business & security decisions

22 May 2017

Australian IT companies are concerned that while they are experiencing successful alignment between business operations and IT departments, security still remains a top concern.

According to ManageEngine’s survey of 152 companies, organisations understanding that aligning people is crucial to aligning IT departments and lines of business. 

However, there is still work to be done around IT departments’ involvement in business decisions. 33% of respondents said their IT department is regularly involved, and 40% said they are sometimes involved.

But the lack of involvement may not be due to a lack of knowledge: 78% of respondents said that IT managers have a good understanding of business, and 66% of business managers said they have a good understanding of IT.

“This survey shows that business-IT alignment is far more than a buzz term in Australia. It’s clearly a corporate cornerstone given how Australian IT managers and business managers collaborate and invest in each other’s area of expertise and how that collaboration and investment benefits the company overall,” comments ManageEngine’s president Raj Sabhlok.

The survey also found that 43% of respondents thought they are exposed to the same level of cyber risk as last year, and 28% believe they are more at risk.

Those risks consist of cyber attacks (57%), data theft by outsiders or unauthorised use of data by an inside employee.

76% of those who had experienced a cyber attack said that they had been attacked between one and five times. 12% had experienced attacks between six and ten times.

59% of respondents said they had experienced unauthorised data access between one and five times. 29% said it had happened between six and ten times.

What does all this mean? Sabhok says there is work to be done, especially around mobile devices and shadow IT.

"If basic steps such as installing patches and regularly updating passwords are not being undertaken, this poses unnecessary extra risks for an organisation,” he comments.

85% of respondents allow remote access to company data and 84% provide a mobile device exactly for that purpose.

47% of businesses either ‘never’ or ‘only occasionally’ automatically install security patches and updates.

While security is a priority, it seems that respondents are also focused on enterprise cloud, with most (34%) adopting the public cloud. 32% chose hybrid cloud and 18% chose a private cloud-only approach.

Google Cloud took out the top spot for public cloud platforms. Organisations see cloud as a positive for sales and marketing (62%), business processes (54%) and collaboration tools (54%).

Slack users urged to update to prevent security vulnerability
Businesses that use popular messaging platform Slack are being urged to update their Slack for Windows to version 3.4.0 immediately.
Secureworks Magic Quadrant Leader for Security Services
This is the 11th time Secureworks has been positioned as a Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Managed Security Services, Worldwide.
Deakin Uni scores double win with Exabeam partnership
Australia’s Deakin University is partnering with SIEM security company Exabeam in an effort to boost the university’s cybersecurity degree program and strengthen its SIEM capabilities.
Google puts Huawei on the Android naughty list
Google has apparently suspended Huawei’s licence to use the full Android platform, according to media reports.
Voter vulnerabilities: Cybersecurity risks impact national elections
The outcome of elections have an enormous impact on the political and cultural landscape of any democratic society. 
Using data science to improve threat prevention
With a large amount of good quality data and strong algorithms, companies can develop highly effective protective measures.
General staff don’t get tech jargon - expert says time to ditch it
There's a serious gap between IT pros and general staff, and this expert says it's on the people in IT to bridge it.
ZombieLoad: Another batch of flaws affect Intel chips
“This flaw can be weaponised in highly targeted attacks that would normally require system-wide privileges or a complete subversion of the operating system."