Story image

ANZ and DXC Technology form autism research partnership

09 Apr 18

DXC Technology has joined ANZ Banking Group’s Autism@Work partnership with La Trobe University.

The partnership supports research into helping autistic people succeed at work.

DXC Technology Australia & New Zealand managing director Seelan Nayagam says the research is aimed at helping people on the spectrum to obtain long-term sustainable employment and to build thriving careers.

“The partnership with ANZ and La Trobe University means that world-leading research in mental health and autism can inform our understanding regarding the needs and supports for people on the spectrum within the workplace,” Nayagam explains.

Professor and director of La Trobe University’s Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, Cheryl Dissanayake, says supporting autistic individuals to excel in the workplace demands more than simply understanding autism.

“Associated conditions like anxiety and sleep disorders can undermine success at work, and these challenges need to be understood, accommodated and supported to ensure success.”

ANZ’s group executive, technology, Gerard Florian, also comments: “Beyond matching talented individuals to areas where we need these skills, what we learn from this research will help improve the way we and other organisations shape workplaces where autistic people can find meaningful long-term work and thrive.”

In addition, ANZ has its Spectrum Program, a 3-year commitment by the banking giant to recognise the talents of people with autism, and then shaping a workplace in which they can thrive.

As part of the Program, a non-traditional recruitment process better suited to the needs of people on the autism spectrum was employed with a focus on cyber security and testing roles.

The first group started work in February 2018 and is receiving tailored training and support to help them settle into the workplace and develop their careers within ANZ and beyond.

Moreover, ANZ’s Spectrum Program has adopted DXC’s Dandelion Program, an Autism@Work initiative running in Australian Federal Government departments.

The Dandelion Program started in 2014 and aims to integrate people with Autism into DXC’s workforce. As the company notes, people with autism have long been overlooked by the workforce with 80% of people with autism unemployed, or under-employed, according to DXC.

Moreover, DXC Technology emphasises that the Dandelion Program is not just about recruiting people with autism.

DXC Technology states: “The Program is also about reworking the organisational fabric of DXC to accept and integrate these individuals and also prepare them for the workplace and for a career at DXC.”

Disruption in the supply chain: Why IT resilience is a collective responsibility
"A truly resilient organisation will invest in building strong relationships while the sun shines so they can draw on goodwill when it rains."
Businesses too slow on attack detection – CrowdStrike
The 2018 CrowdStrike Services Cyber Intrusion Casebook reveals IR strategies, lessons learned, and trends derived from more than 200 cases.
What disaster recovery will look like in 2019
“With nearly half of all businesses experiencing an unrecoverable data event in the last three years, current backup solutions are no longer fit for purpose."
Proofpoint launches feature to identify most targeted users
“One of the largest security industry misconceptions is that most cyberattacks target top executives and management.”
McAfee named Leader in Magic Quadrant an eighth time
The company has been once again named as a Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Security Information and Event Management.
Symantec and Fortinet partner for integration
The partnership will deliver essential security controls across endpoint, network, and cloud environments.
Is Supermicro innocent? 3rd party test finds no malicious hardware
One of the larger scandals within IT circles took place this year with Bloomberg firing shots at Supermicro - now Supermicro is firing back.
25% of malicious emails still make it through to recipients
Popular email security programmes may fail to detect as much as 25% of all emails with malicious or dangerous attachments, a study from Mimecast says.