sb-au logo
Story image

Cylance launches virtual CISO

03 Jan 2019

Cylance has launched a virtual CISO service to give a helping hand to enterprises that need stronger security resources but may lack a real-life CISO.

The program, known as Cylance vCISO, is designed to provide organisations with critical technology and security resources that support next-generation security architectures.

Globally, the cybersecurity skills gap is pronounced – Australia has only 7% of the cybersecurity expertise it needs. Cylance says that the shortage of approximately 2300 cyber professions has cost Australian organisations up to $405 million in revenue.

By 2026, the gap is expected to reach 17,600, as Australia’s share of the cyber security market triples to $6 billion a year, the company claims. The global outlook is in a similar position. Cylance says that the skills gap has increased more than 50% in the last three years and is expected to grow by more than two million this year.

Cylance also claims the cost of cybercrime is projected to reach $6 trillion in 2021. 

Cylance says its security experts provide organisations the expertise to detect and prevent cyber attacks without compromising their ability to deliver on core business objectives.

Cylance Consulting senior vice president Corey White says, “Today’s cybersecurity landscape presents CISOs the challenge of trying to implement digital transformation and other important initiatives across their organisations without the adequate people or systems in place to support the complex environments they manage.”

“To meet those challenges, security leaders require access to expert knowledge on the fly that helps them identify, assess, and communicate security risks to their management teams and boards of directors, which in turn helps them better manage risk and keep the overall costs of security compliance under control.”

Cylance vCISO draws on a broad set of techniques including automation and artifact analysis to collect information and assess data. 

It also defines likely security scenarios to build risk profiles, recommend actions, and highlight internal strengths, allowing organisations to customise their approach to prevention-first security without having to customise all of the technology that supports their security environments.   Cylance says that vCISO helps organisations manage day-to-day security needs and meet common security standards, frameworks, and compliance regulations such as NIST, ISO/IEC, SANS CIS, and more. It does this by assigning experienced security professionals with discrete expertise in the areas customers most want to invest in. Personnel work from remote locations or at a customer’s physical address, depending on the needs and urgency of the project.

Story image
Report: 151% increase in DDoS attacks compared to 2019
It comes as the security risk profile for organisations around the world increased in large part thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, forcing greater reliance on cloud technology and thrusting digital laggards into quick and unsecured migrations.More
Story image
Jamf extends Microsoft collaboration with iOS Device Compliance
Organisations will soon be able to use Jamf for Apple ecosystem management while using Azure Active Directory and Microsoft Endpoint manager to maintain conditional access.More
Story image
Proofpoint launches new SMB focused security awareness training
Proofpoint has launched security awareness training for small to medium businesses (SMBs) with the aim of reducing successful phishing attacks and malware infections to almost zero. More
Story image
Phishing scam imitates SharePoint & OneNote for nefarious clicks
Sophos researchers say that the attackers take a slightly different approach to the standard ‘fake login’ phishing email.More
Story image
Ping named identity solution Leader by ISG
Recognised for Identity & Access Management in the 2020 Provider Lens Cyber Security – Solutions & Services Quadrant Report Australia.More
Story image
Global attack volume down, but fraud and cyber threats still going strong
“The move to digital, for both businesses and consumers, has been significant. Yet with this change comes opportunity for exploitation. Fraudsters look for easy targets: whether government support packages, new lines of credit or media companies with fewer barriers to entry."More