Story image

BDO & AusCERT kick off 2017 A/NZ Cyber Security Survey

14 Aug 17

BDO and AusCERT have kicked off their second annual Cyber Security Survey and they’re looking for input from all decision makers across Australia and New Zealand.

The survey aims to find out current cybersecurity trends, issues and threats facing A/NZ, with the ultimate goal of delivering insights that can help organisations build and maintain their cyber resilience.

BDO’s national leader for Cyber Security, Leon Fouche, says public awareness about cyber issues has never been higher – in part due to the numerous ransomware attacks in recent months.

“The frequency, nature and cost of cyber incidents are on the rise with all industry sectors being targeted.  The survey results will highlight whether that knowledge is translating into business readiness,” he says.

According to BDO, many organisations are now looking at cyber insurance as part of their risk mitigation strategy. The survey also aims to find out whether more organisations are buying cyber insurance this year, and if those insurance policies are adequate in relation to risk exposures and current cybersecurity risk levels.

“Last year we received strong support from industry, with more than 400 respondents across a variety of industry sectors. The value of the benchmark data we obtained not only provides a snapshot of the current state of the cyber landscape in Australia and New Zealand, but it also allows businesses to conduct local benchmarking,” Fouche comments.

The 2016 survey found that 22.1% of respondents experienced ransomware incidents in the last financial year, but only 10.8% expected to encounter them in the next year.

13% said they expected incidents caused by unauthorised access to information by external users, and 11.9% expected malware/Trojans as well as data loss.

Brute force attacks scored lowest on participants’ radars: Only 1.7% expected them in the coming financial year, down from 2.8% in the last year.

The survey also found that 98.2% of respondents in state government had email filtering systems, compared to 88.5% of those in education and training institutions.

Respondents across all sectors scored low on regular cyber risk assessments: 48.9% of those in professional, scientific and technical services, compared to 71.4% in information media and telecommunications.

Information media and telecommunications also scored highest in cybersecurity awareness (68.6%), compared to 41.7% in education and training.

The 2017 survey is now open and closes on Friday September 15. All survey data is anonymous. Those who participate get direct access to the final report in November. Those interested can participate through AusCERT.org.au or bdo.com.au.

Oracle Java Card update boosts security for IoT devices
"Java Card 3.1 is very significant to the Internet of Things, bringing interoperability, security and flexibility to a fast-growing market currently lacking high-security and flexible edge security solutions."
Sophos hires ex-McAfee SVP Gavin Struther
After 16 years as the APAC senior vice president and president for McAfee, Struthers is now heading the APJ arm of Sophos.
Security platform provider Deep Instinct expands local presence
The company has made two A/NZ specific leadership hires and formed several partnerships with organisations in the region.
Half of companies unable to detect IoT device breaches
A Gemalto study also shows that the of blockchain technology to help secure IoT data, services and devices has doubled in a year.
Stepping up to sell security services in A/NZ
WatchGuard Technologies A/NZ regional director gives his top tips on how to make a move into the increasingly lucrative cybersecurity services market.
Huawei founder publically denies spying allegations
“After all the evidence is made public, we will rely on the justice system.”
Malware downloader on the rise in Check Point’s latest Threat Index
Organisations continue to be targeted by cryptominers, despite an overall drop in value across all cryptocurrencies in 2018.
IoT breaches: Nearly half of businesses still can’t detect them
The Internet of Thing’s (IoT’s) rapid rise to prominence may have compromised its security, if a new report from Gemalto is anything to go by.