Story image

Company culture holding back DevSecOps adoption – CA Technologies

03 Jul 18

The current company culture of most organisations in the Asia Pacific and Japan (APJ) region is hindering the integration of security practices in the software development lifecycle and the adoption of DevSecOps.

This is according to the results of a global CA Technologies survey on secure software development.

Only about one in five (21%) of the APJ respondents believe that their organisation’s present culture and practices support collaboration across development, operations and security.

Conducted by IT industry analyst firm Freeform Dynamics, the new report, Integrating Security into the DNA of Your Software Lifecycle, aims to provide insights on how the integration of security into  DevSecOps has become the new imperative.

The global study involved a survey of more than 1,200 IT leaders across 15 markets, including some 575 respondents from seven APJ markets, namely China, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Australia.

As software becomes more critical to business success in the digital economy, security concerns are exponentially on the rise.

In fact, the study shows that close to three in four (74%) of APJ respondents agreed that security threats due to software and code issues are a growing concern.

However, 57% of respondents cited existing culture as hurdles in embedding security testing and evaluation within software development processes.

In the same vein, only 22% of the respondents indicated that their senior management understands the importance of not sacrificing security for time-to-market success.

DevSecOps approach to security vital to APJ’s digital economy

All these findings point to an organisational culture gap that is impeding organisations’ ability to make security a more integral part of software development.

Asia Pacific and Japan security vice president Gene Ng says, “In today’s digital world, ever-increasing customer demands are pushing many organisations to release software applications and their updates on a near-continuous basis.

“When security is left to the end of the application development lifecycle, it is all too easy to give in to the pressure of getting the application out the door.”

“With shorter delivery cycles, it is essential that security practices are integrated into every step of the software lifecycle. This is the basic principle behind DevSecOps, and everyone in the software development lifecycle is responsible for security.”

In APJ, almost three-quarters (74%) of the IT leaders surveyed highlighted that it is critical for security practices to be integrated into the software development lifecycle.

By adopting DevSecOps, organisations can eliminate security vulnerabilities and the high cost associated with them, such as production downtime, data breaches, loss of consumer trust and negative brand reputation.

DevSecOps will also help organisations deliver secure software, which will, in turn, help boost users’ trust in applications and digital services – the fuel of today’s digital economy.

According to the study, a majority of the respondents from APJ agreed that software development supports growth and expansion (95%), helps businesses compete (88%) and drives digital transformation (87%).

Positive signs in attitude and approaches towards security in APJ

Despite the cultural challenges and rising concerns, the survey found that IT leaders in APJ hold a forward-looking view when it comes to the role that security plays in business today.

More than three-quarter (76%) of the respondents agree that security is an enabler of new business opportunities.

In addition, 77% agree that their security teams are perceived as leaders, not innovation blockers, by business units.

Another heartening development highlighted by the study is the prevalent use of advanced technologies by organisations to strengthen security.

More than 80% of the respondents shared that the use of behavioural analytics and machine learning are critical for the following areas:

  • Providing a better user experience while still protecting user data (81%);
  • Assessing the threat of data breaches based on patterns of activity (83%);
  • Taking pre-emptive action to avoid a data breach and/or mitigate the impact of one (85%);
  • Authenticating controls based on what a user is doing and what you know about them (86%).
Using blockchain to ensure regulatory compliance
“Data privacy regulations such as the GDPR require you to put better safeguards in place to protect customer data, and to prove you’ve done it."
A10 aims to secure Kubernetes container environments
The solution aims to provide teams deploying microservices applications with an automated way to integrate enterprise-grade security with comprehensive application visibility and analytics.
DigiCert conquers Google's distrust of Symantec certs
“This could have been an extremely disruptive event to online commerce," comments DigiCert CEO John Merrill. 
One Identity a Visionary in Magic Quad for PAM
One Identity was recognised in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Privileged Access Management for completeness of vision and ability to execute.
How to keep network infrastructure secure and available
Two OVH executives have weighed in on how network infrastructure and the challenges in that space will be evolving in the coming year.
Gartner names newcomer Exabeam a leader in SIEM
The vendor landscape for SIEM is evolving, with recent entrants bringing technologies optimised for analytics use cases.
52mil users affected by Google+’s second data breach
Google+ APIs will be shut down within the next 90 days, and the consumer platform will be disabled in April 2019 instead of August 2019 as originally planned.
Symantec releases neural network-integrated USB scanning station
Symantec Industrial Control System Protection Neural helps defend against USB-borne cyber attacks on operational technology.